11/23/16

Church Times

newlanthony

New Llanthony Abbey by Hugh Allen, published by YouCaxton, has received an excellent review in the Church Times:

‘In the midst of the burgeoning religious fervour of 19th-century Britain, the tragic-comic figure of Joseph Leycester Lyne [Fr Ignatius] must surely represent the epitome of … the “virtuoso religion” of some of its more enthusiastic and eccentric characters.  As such, a book like Hugh Allen’s has been lacking for a long time…..

The whole work is forensically researched, meticulously referenced, and fluently written – a winning combination that makes it as enjoyable as it is useful – and the footnotes are often as interesting and informative as the main body of the text.

Lyne was either a faithful thwarted prophet or a volatile pious lunatic.  Perhaps he was a heady combination of both; but Allen leaves that judgement to the reader, and does so in a masterly fashion.  This book has been well worth the wait.’

11/21/16

Wanderlost

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Rebecca Weaver’s Wanderlost is now published on Amazon, the engaging account of a young woman travelling for several months’ through Australia and the Far East, and her triumph over fears and various difficult situations.

 

11/16/16

Reader’s Copies for Writers

Reader’s Copies  – a special YouCaxton service for writers.

Reader’s copies are plain, white paperback books designed for circulation among friendly critics at an early stage. Critical readers can be an enormous benefit to authors because their feedback is likely to come from different perspectives – style, structure, story-line, grammar, continuity, factual accuracy – and once a book is in a bound, printed form it is far easier for them (and you) to view it objectively as a finished product.

What is a Reader’s Copy?

A reader’s copy is a pre-publication version of your book.
The purpose is to see your manuscript in book-format and to have the book criticised at an early stage by friends and colleagues who can give you constructive feedback.
The reader’s copy will also help you to consider some of the design aspects of your book such as book-size, number of pages, type-size, typeface and margins.
Reader’s copies can also be useful as low-cost, archive copies of texts that you choose not to bring to publication.
There are three standard sizes: 6 x 9 inches, 5.5 x 8.5 inches and 5.25 x 8 inches

How does it work?

1. Send us your manuscript in Word format.
2. We check it and let you know if we’re able to produce a Reader’s Copy from it.
3. We convert the Word file to a print-ready PDF.
4. We add page-numbers and standard front-matter including title pages and contents.
5. We produce a standard white cover, printed with your book-title, subtitle and author-name.
6. We produce as many copies as you need.
The whole process takes about three weeks.

How much does it cost?

Preparation of print-ready files and printer-upload fee: £50
Note that if you subsequently decide to publish your book with YouCaxton,
the £50 fee can be credited against the cost of typesetting the finished book.

The cost of printing is 70p plus 1p per page

Example print cost for a book of 200 pages
Preparation and Upload fee: £50
+ £2.70 per copy (200 pages at 1p per page plus 70p for the cover)
+ Delivery/postage at cost

Note that subsequent orders can be placed for additional books but there is an admin fee of £10 per order

Optional extras

Add an image to the front cover – supplied by the Author: £15
Add back cover Blurb – supplied by the Author: £15

Professional services

Layout and typesetting of interior: £175
Full cover design and layout: £175
Proof reading: £8 per 1000 words
Copy-editing: £8 per 1000 words

Can I get Reader’s Copies if my book is in colour or large format?

Yes – but we would need to work out a special price for you.

How do I get started?

Just contact us by email at newbooks@youcaxton.co.uk

or use the Contact form from the Menu

11/14/16

History of medieval Weymouth and its evolution as a trading port.
James Crump

9781909644809 Weymouth is usually thought of as a ‘Georgian’ town, but this book shows how much of the physical appearance of the town was determined many years before the arrival of George III himself. It examines the parallel histories of the twin towns of Weymouth and Melcombe Regis from the eleventh century to the end of the sixteenth, charting their rise and subsequent decline. It explains how their early growth was based on the great medieval trades of wool and wine and how growth was influenced by their connections with France which developed particularly in the years of the Angevin Empire. Their later decline was caused by the disruption of these trades and by the ravages of war in the Channel, part of the great conflict with France known as the ‘Hundred Years’ War’. In the midst of this the population was overwhelmed by the catastrophe of the Black Death.
Published:7th July 2015
Paperback:112 pages
Price:£6.99
ISBN:9-781909-644717
Available from Amazon

Pay with PayPal
£6.99 (+ £2 postage)

James Crump read modern history at the University of Oxford and taught school students, undergraduates and extramural classes for many years. Before moving to Dorset he has written on social and industrial history subjects mainly in northern contexts. He has been researching Dorset history for many years and is especially interested in the early history of towns.

Reviews...

11/10/16

Button Gwynnett

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Button Gwinnett, Failed Merchant, Plantation Owner, Mountebank, Opportunist Politician and Founding Father by Colin Sharp, published by YouCaxton, may have been published at an opportune moment, since moves to restore his tomb and the family vault in the Colonial Park Cemetery in Savannah Georgia have been taking place simultaneously. It is hoped by those who take an interest in his life, that book and tomb together will help to cement Button Gwinnett’s somewhat disreputable place in American history.

11/8/16

Woman’s Hour, Netta Cartwright

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The Many Lives of Zillah Smith: an English Romany is to be featured in an interview of Zillah and author Netta Cartwright on Woman’s Hour on BBC Radio 4, on Friday Nov 11th sometime between 10 and 11 am. We hope you get a chance to tune in. If not it will be available on catch up on their website. The first two editions of the book have already sold out and we’ve just published a special memorial edition acknowledging Netta’s daughter, the late Dr Katherine Mulraney, as the editor.
11/8/16

The story of six generations of an English Romany family
Netta Cartright

new-2 Zillah Smith and her Romany Gypsy ancestors have travelled the lanes and roads of Staffordshire and the surrounding area for centuries. This memoir, set in the present day from the viewpoint of ninety-one-year-old Zillah, follows the stories of six generations of her family through a series of remembrances.
Dating from the late 1800s, this memoir gives us a glimpse into the resilient lives of a Romany Gypsy family in one of the most transformative centuries in British history. We enter into their world of birth and death, childhood and schooling, courtship and marriage, their domestic and working life, and their love of life up close to nature in their tents and caravans. These stories of the old and current travelling traditions show how Zillah and her family have survived and thrived through times of war, violence, evictions and persecution.
Published:July 2016
Paperback:146 pages
Price:£10.00
ISBN:9-781911-175193


Available from YouCaxton

£10.00 (+ £2 postage)

Number of copies:



Available from Amazon

Netta Cartwright is an author of educational books. This book, her first memoir, is written with and on behalf of Zillah Smith and her family.
Netta is a graduate of Aberystwyth, Cardiff, Keele and Birmingham Universities and is a school counselling trainer with thirty years school-teaching experience. She was Equal Opportunities Advisor for Staffordshire LEA where she promoted anti-racist projects in schools. She leads peer-support courses in the UK and abroad in primary and secondary schools in the public and private sector. Her publications include: "Towards Bully Free Schools: Interventions in Action" (OUP); “Peer Support Works: a Step by Step Guide to Long Term Success” (Network Continuum); and many articles in educational journals. Her work in schools has been featured on Channel 4 and BBC1.
Reader Reviews...

Dr. Martin Kovats
Political Scientist, Former Advisor to the EU Commission on the EU Roma Integration Framework

“I enjoyed this book very much. It provides such an insightful account of Zillah’s life as a Gypsy from an age of horse powered freedom to council sites. Zillah’s story illustrates the central importance of kinship as the world changes around her and her own life is transformed. For her it is caring for the chavvies, parents, siblings and husband that is most important. I also liked the use of photos, themselves treasured family mementos, to illustrate her memories. The text is honest using direct quotes to provide authenticity.”

Pat Sanderson, Poet.
“Netta Cartwright invited Zillah in and got to know her and her family in a relationship that has spanned thirty years. This remarkable book is the result. She has told Zillah’s story with compassion and humour. It is a fascinating piece of social history.”

Thomas Acton OBE, Emeritus Professor of Romani Studies, University of Greenwich.
“An unaffected and deeply felt depiction of the complex intensity of English Romani family life over the past one hundred years. It is a rare book about a Romani woman by a woman and valuable for that.”

Dr Liz Doherty, Professor Emerita, Sheffield Hallam University
“This is an important piece of social history. The evocative narrative weaves Zillah’s current life together with memories and stories from the past, and a world of freedom, colour, hardship and fierce loyalty is opened up to the reader.”

Roy Samson, Writer.
“Zillah’s story is of a life lived more intensely than most of us experience. The Many Lives allows us glimpses into a world that is close to ours yet intriguingly strange, seeming more natural but rapidly passing. Netta Cartwright tells the story with warm commitment and love.”

11/6/16

1945, Two young women start a new enterprise in Exmouth
Kirstine Richards

KR-TSH-421 CS cov v3-1.indd Two young, recently widowed mothers try to find a way to survive in war-scarred Britain. Kirstine and her German friend, Gerdy, lost their husbands at the end of the Second World War. They find themselves penniless, without any extended family support, each with two very young children and with scant prospects of earning a living. A great deal of determined initiative is needed. The stakes are high with chaos threatening them at every step. The two women find a de-requisitioned building in seaside Devon. They transform it into a family hotel, which eventually becomes renowned for its excellent cuisine. This enchanting story, told with a lightness of touch, moves from tragedy, to comedy, to triumph and back again.
Published:November 2016
Paperback:234 pages
Price:£10.00
ISBN:9-781911-175421


Available from YouCaxton

£10.00 (+ £2 postage)
Number of copies:



Available from Amazon

Kirstine Richards née Rasmussen was born in Edinburgh to a Danish father, Christian Rasmussen, and Hilda Hill-Jones, on 14th March 1912, whose mother was Mary Ann McNair. She attended Edinburgh School of Art for one year, until her father died and the fees could no longer be paid. Life with her eccentric mother became intolerable. Fortunately an aunt came to the rescue and Kirstine moved to Devon, where she worked as a poorly paid designer at the Honiton Pottery. Subsequently Kirstine opened a café on Honiton High Street, called the ‘Highland Fling’ and it served excellent coffee and homemade cakes; making it very popular. She met her future husband, Gerald Arthur Richards; a young medical student from St. Bartholomew’s Hospital, at the ‘Highland Fling’. Their two children, Nicholas and Louanne, were born during the 2nd World War and their father, Gerry, was accidentally wounded in Burma and died at Imphal on the 23rd January 1945. Kirstine, now a widow with two young children, had to find a way of earning a living. She and Gerdy Ramsay, who was also a widow and mother of two, together established a family hotel; ‘The Seagull’ in Exmouth in South Devon. The hotel opened in 1945. In 1959 Kirstine moved on from being a hotelier to becoming the case worker at the newly formed Agnostic Adoption Society, which was later to become the Independent Adoption Society. On retirement, she went to live near her cousin in the South of France, where she rented a small house; paying for her keep by hosting summer guests. A secondary breast cancer made her decide to move back to England, where she found an apartment at Queen Alexandra’s Court in Wimbledon; an attractive establishment for the widows of officers who had served in the forces. Kirstine died at St. Raphael’s hospice in London on the 25th February 1989.
Reader Reviews...

Review by Jane Dunbar
A truly inspiring book. A story of perseverance in the face of amazing difficulties., in which the author manages to infuse one disaster after another with humour.
Oh how I enjoyed it.

Amazon review by Mrs Rivers
I have just romped through The Seagull Hotel in 3 sittings- I loved it!

What a very special woman Kirstine was, so full of determination, courage and enthusiasm, undaunted, it seems by anything. Reading her story, she emerges as a precursor to 60’s feminism; widowed towards the end of WW2, mother of two small children with virtually no money, she navigates a path through what was then very much a man’s world of bankers and builders, discovering en route the thrills and spills of the black market in order to beat the post-war rationing system. With her friend Gerdy, also a young widow with children, she battles to establish The Seagull Hotel not just as a viable business but also as a loving home for the two families. What could have been just another drab seaside hotel on the English coast develops into a truly creative enterprise and becomes widely known for its excellent gourmet food. This splendid book is a hymn and testament to these two young women who refused to let misfortune, or men, get the better of them but don’t get the idea that it is in any way heavy going or gloomy. It is written with a lightness of touch, masses of humour - I laughed till I cried over the chapter about her mother - and, above all, humanity.

Amazon review by nettiek50
This is a beautifully written memoir
About two young widows struggling in a male dominated post war era.
A very easy and enlightening read. Parts of Exmouth remain the same to this day.