Tim Waterstone

Roger Ordish was a TV producer for many years. His memoir, If I Remember Rightly, recently published by YouCaxton, is a very entertaining and interesting account of his years in television and of the celebrities whom he worked with. His old friend Tim Waterstone, founder of Waterstone’s bookshops, has  just sent a delightful recommendation.

 

If I Remember Rightly arrived yesterday, and I started reading it this morning, at 6.30 am, over my first-of-the-day mug of tea. Thereafter I couldn’t put it down, effectively reading it all through at one sitting. Roger – I really loved it. And, perhaps more importantly, really admired it, and indeed, from it, you. We were such close friends as teenagers, and it is a real pleasure for me to now realise, more fully perhaps than I had before, what a wonderfully rich and rewarding career, and life, that you have led. Your description of it absolutely holds the reader. And you write so well – the ‘voice’ is delightful – sometimes very funny indeed – (my absolute favourite of all your wonderful anecdotes being the little Ken Dodd piece) – sometimes unexpectedly vulnerable and exposed.

 

Ace stuff, all of it.So well done, my friend. T.’

Georgia Historical Society, Stan Deaton: Button Gwinnett

Stan Deaton, Professor at the Georgia History Library in Savannah, gives an excellent short summary of the life of Button Gwinnett (who signed the American Declaration on Independence) in this short clip, referring in complimentary terms to Button Gwinnett by Colin Gwinnett Sharp, published by YouCaxton Publications.

 

Well worth a listen:

Abergavenny Writing Festival

YouCaxton were set to give a workshop on self-publishing at the Abergavenny Writing Festival on 2 April. Sadly, the festival has been cancelled due to the Coronavirus emergency measures. We ourselves remain very much open for business. Indeed, we’re hopeful that self-immolation may lead some writers to complete their books ahead of schedule.  In any case, we wish everyone well.

 

Abergavenny Writing Festival, Self-Publishing Workshop

YouCaxton is hosting a workshop on self-publishing at the Abergavenny Writing Festival on Thursday 2 April at 16.30. Writers will hear a series of short presentations on the self-publishing process, from editing through to the production of print-ready files and publication. The workshop will also cover eBooks and marketing. There will be limited time for questions but Bob Fowke, our managing editor, will stay after the workshop has finished and should be able to answer them then.

 

Topics to be covered will include:

1. Editing and why it matters. 2. Preparing the manuscript and thinking about the niche, 3. Design, layout and print-ready files, 4. Printing, publication and ISBNs, 6. Distribution through Amazon, online sales, and bookshops, 7. eBooks, 8. Pricing your book.

 

Self-Publishing Workshop Stafford

Bob Fowke, YouCaxton’s Managing Editor, will be hosting a workshop on self-publishing in Stafford Public Library on 13th May, 7.00-9.00 pm. With him will be Shirley McLellan of Perfect Proof, our associate editor.

 

This will be an opportunity to learn about all aspects of self-publishing from completing your manuscript to decisions about design and layout, through to publication and the final print-ready files. There will be a series of short presentations with plenty of opportunity for questions. If you have written a book or you are in the process of writing one, do come along.

 

Topics to be covered:

1. Editing and why it matters. 2. Preparing the manuscript and thinking about the niche, 3. Design, layout and print-ready files, 4. Printing, publication and ISBNs, 6. Distribution through Amazon, online sales, and bookshops, 7. eBooks, 8. Pricing your book.

 

Free. To reserve a place please contact:
email: Stafford.library@staffordshire.gov.uk or telephone 01785 278351.

 

Opium & Pagodas – Talk

Duel Avenue Calcutta

Bob Fowke, YouCaxton’s Managing Editor, will be giving a  talk entitled Opium & Pagodas Aspects of life in 18th Century India at the Church Barn, Bishop’s Castle, Sunday 23rd February at 2.00 pm,  admission free.

 

In July 1775, Maharaja Nuncomar and Joseph Fowke were tried in Calcutta for conspiracy against Governor Warren Hastings. Nuncomar was hanged for a parallel offence; Joseph got off with a fine of fifty rupees. Two years later, Philip Francis, Hastings’s chief opponent on the Council and a friend of Joseph, was caught in flagrante with a ladder beneath the bedroom of beautiful Mrs Grand, who went on to marry Prince Tallyrand while he was foreign minister to Napoleon. Two years after that, Francis challenged Hastings to a duel but neither man knew how to shoot a pistol and Francis was wounded but survived. In the meantime, Joseph gambled away his second fortune and sailed for home, having sold his Stradivarius cello and complaining about the new-fangled music of Haydn.

 

Life for British residents in Calcutta in the late eighteenth century was incestuous but colourful. Bob Fowke explores some aspects of this exotic world in his illustrated talk.

 

Writer’s Lodge

After much planning, we have finally started work to convert some redundant commercial buildings in Bishop’s Castle into a Writer’s Lodge, intended to compliment services already provided by YouCaxton. It will involve the conversion of a Victorian slaughter house and a medieval barn to provide space for seminars along with technical facilities and self-catering accommodation for aspiring writers.

 

Writers will be able to participate in courses, retreats, seminars and one-to-one tuition on a wide variety of pre-publishing issues. They will also be given access to the expertise at YouCaxton Publications for help with book design, as well as planning, publication and distribution.

Central to the project is the creation of a two-bedroom cottage and studio, both with lovely views over the south Shropshire hills and this is the renovation work which has now started. We expect it to be finished before the swallows return in June.

We also have a new member on the team, Caroline Denham, to oversee the project.

Stratford Herald review

It’s Not About Shakespeare, Aspects of Ordinary Life in Stratford-upon-Avon 1775-1915 by Val Horton, published by YouCaxton Publications, has received a long and favourabel review in the Stratford Herald:

 

‘Prepare to be transfixed by chapters on slavery, insurrection, the workhouse, education, housing, suffragettes and more  … We tend to think the past is largely about strong men dominating the scene but strong women are also key in this tale and, of course, some of the financial details are fascinating – seeing how much landmark buildings once cost and realising that  the seemingly trifling sums quoted are considerable in today’s terms.

Indeed, the house that started it all was sold for the first time, a few years old, for £450 in May 1911 and in 1930 reached the giddy heights of £650 when it was sold again. But we’re drifting again into the detail.

Let’s just say this is the kind of book that is certain to add to what most of us will know of Stratford’s past, linking every aspect of life across the years. As others have said, it is brilliantly researched at the treasure trove that is the birthplace trust’s archives, with some of the evidence coming from past editions of the Herald.’